admin

admin
less than a month ago
2020-03-19 06:35:32

A forum for listing of official prevention measures as well as user discussion.
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admin

admin
less than a month ago
2020-03-21 12:00:43

A US medical scientist said that the prevention measures against coronavirus COVID-19 have left out a possible entry point of the virus in the head.

READ THE ARTICLE HERE
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admin

admin
about a week ago
2020-03-27 03:05:14

The prevention guidelines against COVID-19 may be inadequate.

URGENT REVISION OF PROPHYLACTIC MEASURES AGAINST COVID-19
   
    DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.15227.26407
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admin

admin
about a week ago
2020-03-27 03:14:12

Is anosmia a useful diagnostic tool for COVID019? In the following article it is proposed tha anosmia may point to a new entry point for coronavirus on its way to the lungs.

The significance of observed anosmia in COVID-19    Project: Methods of prevention and therapy of coronavirus infection COVID-19
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admin

admin
about a week ago
2020-03-27 03:21:11

The observed loss of taste in COVID-19 patients may not be a good diagnostic tool. However, it points to the ear as an additional entry point of coronovirus on its way to the lungs.

The significance of observed loss of taste in COVID-19
    Project: Methods of prevention and therapy of coronavirus infection COVID-19

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Cranial Nerves for Medical Students: with clinical correlations by Dr. Michael M. Nikoletseas This is a unique book. Written by a professor of Medicine who spent years teaching medical anatomy in the laboratory as well the lecture hall of USA medical schools, this book teaches you the cranial nerves in three dimensional space. You need to know the cranial nerves in three dimensional space; knowing the cranial nerves in lists, tables and mnemonics is useless for practicing physicians. An additional unique feature of this book is the connections it makes to neuroanatomy which is traditionally taught in the second semester to first-year medical students in the USA. Lastly, physicians, especially neurosurgeons and radiologists, will find the detailed tracing of cranial nerves in the cranium useful